Travels Of Richard And John Lander Into The Interior Of Africa For The Discovery Of The Course And Termination Of The Niger By Robert Huish



















 - TRAVELS
OF
RICHARD AND JOHN  LANDER,
INTO
THE INTERIOR OF AFRICA,
FOR THE DISCOVERY
OF THE
COURSE AND TERMINATION OF - Page 1
Travels Of Richard And John Lander Into The Interior Of Africa For The Discovery Of The Course And Termination Of The Niger By Robert Huish - Page 1 of 302 - First - Home

Enter page number    Next

Number of Words to Display Per Page: 250 500 1000

Save Money On Flights

TRAVELS OF RICHARD AND JOHN LANDER, INTO THE INTERIOR OF AFRICA, FOR THE DISCOVERY OF THE COURSE AND TERMINATION OF THE NIGER;

FROM UNPUBLISHED DOCUMENTS IN THE POSSESSION OF THE LATE CAPT.

JOHN WILLIAM BARBER FULLERTON, Employed in the African Service:

WITH A Prefatory Analysis of the Previous Travels OF PARK, DENHAM, CLAPPERTON, ADAMS, LYON, RITCHIE, &c. Into the hitherto unexplored Countries of Africa.

BY ROBERT HUISH, ESQ.

Author of the "Last Voyage of Capt. Sir John Ross, to the Arctic Regions," "Memoirs of W. Cobbett, Esq." "Private and Political Life of the late Henry Hunt, Esq." &c. &c. &c.

LONDON:

(Printed for the Proprietors,)

PUBLISHED BY JOHN SAUNDERS, 25, NEWGATE STREET.

1836.

INTRODUCTION.

Many are the acquisitions which geography has made since the boundaries of commerce have been extended, and the spirit of enterprise has carried our adventurous countrymen into countries which had never yet been indented by a European foot; and which, in the great map of the world, appeared as barren and uninhabitable places, destitute of all resources from which the traveller could derive a subsistence. It must, however, on the other hand, be admitted, that design has frequently had little to do in the discovery of those countries, however well it may have been conceived, and however great the perseverance may have been, which was exhibited in the pursuit. The discovery of America was, indeed, a splendid example of an enlightened conception, and an undaunted heroism, crowned with the most complete success; and the laudable and unabated ardour which this country, in despite of the most appalling obstacles, has persisted in solving the great geographical problem of the Course and Termination of the Niger, may be placed second in rank to the discovery of America.

As long as any fact is shut out from the knowledge of man, he who is in search of it will supply the deficiency by his own conclusions, which will be more or less removed from the object of his pursuit, according to the previous opinions which he may have formed, or to the credit which he may have placed on the reports of others. These remarks cannot be better illustrated, than in the case furnished by the Joliba, the Quorra, or Niger, the termination of which river was utterly unknown until Richard and John Lander, braving difficulties which would have broken any other hearts than theirs, succeeded in navigating the river until its conflux with the ocean. Since Park's first discovery of the Joliba, every point of the compass has been assumed for the ulterior course and termination of that river, and however wrong subsequent discovery has proved this speculative geography to have been, it is not to be regarded as useless. Theories may be far short of the truth, but while they display the ingenuity and reasoning powers of their authors, they tend to keep alive that spirit of inquiry and thirst for knowledge which terminates in discovery.

Various accounts of this river had been gradually collected from different sources, which afforded grounds for fresh theories respecting its termination. That of Reichard was the favourite, he supposing that it assumed a southwest course, and terminated in the gulph of Guinea. It was observed at the time, that there was neither evidence on which such an opinion could be supported, nor any by which it could be refuted. Discovery has proved him to be right in respect to its ultimate disposal; but at the same time, he participated in the general error regarding its course to Wangara. These different opinions appeared in several publications, in which, as might be expected, much error was mixed up with the general correctness. That the river flowed into the sea at Funda, was the principal and chief point that was gained; but the most extraordinary circumstance attending this discovery, was, that no one knew where Funda was. The only exception to these was the theory of Major Denham, supported by Sultan Bello's information, who continued its easterly course below Boossa, and ended it in Lake Tchad.

Such was the uncertain condition in which the course of the Niger remained, when the happy idea occurred of sending the Messrs. Landers to follow its course below Boossa. By this step the British government completed what it had begun, and accomplished in a few months the work of ages.

CONTENTS

CHAP. I. Herodutus. Early History of Africa. Interior of Africa. Malte Brun. Division of Africa. Early African Discoveries. Portuguese Discoveries. Madeira. Island of Arguin. Bemoy. Prester John. Death of Bemoy. Elmina. Ogane. John II. Lord of Guinea. Diego Cam. His return to Congo. Catholic Missionaries. Acts of the Missionaries. Magical Customs of the Natives. Expulsion of the Portuguese.

CHAP. II. Expeditions of the English. Thompson. First Expedition of Jobson. African Animals. Jobson's arrival at Tenda. Bukar Sano. Second Expedition of Jobson. The Horey. Expedition of Vermuyden. Expedition of Stibbs. Falls of Barraconda. Natives of Upper Gambia. Dangers from the Elephants and Sea Horses. Travels of Jannequin.

CHAP. III. African Association. Expedition of Ledyard. His Death. Expedition of Lucas. Major Houghton. His Death.

CHAP V. [*] Park's First Journey. Pisania. Dr. Laidley. Jindy. Mandingo Negroes. Kootacunda. Woolli. Konjour. Membo Jumbo. Tallika. Ganado. Kuorkarany. Fatteconda. Almami. Departure from Fatteconda. Joag. Robbery of Mr. Park by the Natives. Demba Sego. Gungadi. Tesee. Tigitty Sego. Anecdote of an African Wife. Kooniakary. Sambo Sego.

[Footnote: Chap. IV. was accidentally numbered Chap. V.]

CHAP. VI. King Semba. Sego Jalla. Salem Daucari. Route from Soolo to Feesurah. Kemmoo. Kaarta. Koorabarri. Funing Kedy. Ali, King of Ludamar. Sampaka. Arrival at the Camp of Ali. Conduct of the Moors. Robberies of Ali. Illness of Mr. Park. Curiosity of the African Ladies. Whirlwinds of the Desert. An African Wedding.

CHAP. VII. Sufferings of Mr. Park. Departure of Ali. Park's introduction to Fatima. Beauty of the Moorish Women. The Great Desert of Jarra. Demba Taken by the Moors. Jarra. Queira. Escape of Mr. Park. His perilous Situation. Shrilla. Wawra. Dingyee. Departure from Doolinkeaboo. First view of the Niger. Amiable conduct of a Bambara Woman.

Enter page number   Next
Page 1 of 302
Words from 1 to 1005 of 309561


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next

More links: First 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200
 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 290 300
 Last

Display Words Per Page: 250 500 1000

 
Africa (29)
Asia (27)
Europe (59)
North America (58)
Oceania (24)
South America (8)
 

List of Travel Books RSS Feeds

Africa Travel Books RSS Feed

Asia Travel Books RSS Feed

Europe Travel Books RSS Feed

North America Travel Books RSS Feed

Oceania Travel Books RSS Feed

South America Travel Books RSS Feed

Copyright © 2005 - 2012 Travel Guides