Travels In Alaska By John Muir













































































































































 - Travels in Alaska

by John Muir


Contents

        Preface

             Part I. The Trip of 1879

     I. Puget Sound and British Columbia - Page 1
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Travels In Alaska

By John Muir

Contents

Preface

Part I. The Trip of 1879

I. Puget Sound and British Columbia II. Alexander Archipelago and the Home I found in Alaska III. Wrangell Island and Alaska Summers IV. The Stickeen River V. A Cruise in the Cassiar VI. The Cassiar Trail VII. Glenora Peak VIII. Exploration of the Stickeen Glaciers IX. A Canoe Voyage to Northward X. The Discovery of Glacier Bay XI. The Country of the Chilcats XII. The Return to Fort Wrangell XIII. Alaska Indians

Part II. The Trip of 1880

XIV. Sum Dum Bay XV. From Taku River to Taylor Bay XVI. Glacier Bay Part III. The Trip of 1890

XVII. In Camp at Glacier Bay XVIII. My Sled-Trip on the Muir Glacier XIX. Auroras

Glossary of Words in the Chinook Jargon

Preface

Forty years ago John Muir wrote to a friend; "I am hopelessly and forever a mountaineer. . . . Civilization and fever, and all the morbidness that has been hooted at me, have not dimmed my glacial eyes, and I care to live only to entice people to look at Nature's loveliness." How gloriously he fulfilled the promise of his early manhood! Fame, all unbidden, wore a path to his door, but he always remained a modest, unspoiled mountaineer. Kindred spirits, the greatest of his time, sought him out, even in his mountain cabin, and felt honored by his friendship. Ralph Waldo Emerson urged him to visit Concord and rest awhile from the strain of his solitary studies in the Sierra Nevada. But nothing could dislodge him from the glacial problems of the high Sierra; with passionate interest he kept at his task. "The grandeur of these forces and their glorious results," he once wrote, "overpower me and inhabit my whole being. Waking or sleeping, I have no rest. In dreams I read blurred sheets of glacial writing, or follow lines of cleavage, or struggle with the difficulties of some extraordinary rock-form."

There is a note of pathos, the echo of an unfulfilled hope, in the record of his later visit to Concord. "It was seventeen years after our parting on Wawona ridge that I stood beside his [Emerson's] grave under a pine tree on the hill above Sleepy Hollow. He had gone to higher Sierras, and, as I fancied, was again waving his hand in friendly recognition." And now John Muir has followed his friend of other days to the "higher Sierras." His earthly remains lie among trees planted by his own hand. To the pine tree of Sleepy Hollow answers a guardian sequoia in the sunny Alhambra Valley.

In 1879 John Muir went to Alaska for the first time. Its stupendous living glaciers aroused his unbounded interest, for they enabled him to verify his theories of glacial action. Again and again he returned to this continental laboratory of landscapes. The greatest of the tide-water glaciers appropriately commemorates his name. Upon this book of Alaska travels, all but finished before his unforeseen departure, John Muir expended the last months of his life.

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