Arizona Sketches By Joseph A. Munk














































































































































 - ARIZONA SKETCHES 

by Joseph A. Munk



CHAPTER

I.    A ROMANTIC LAND
II.   MY FIRST TRIP TO ARIZONA
III.  THE OPEN - Page 1
Arizona Sketches By Joseph A. Munk - Page 1 of 72 - First - Home

Enter page number    Next

Number of Words to Display Per Page: 250 500 1000

Save Money On Flights

ARIZONA SKETCHES

By Joseph A. Munk

CHAPTER

I. A ROMANTIC LAND II. MY FIRST TRIP TO ARIZONA III. THE OPEN RANGE IV. RANCH LIFE V. THE ROUND-UP VI. RANCH HAPPENINGS VII. A MODEL RANCH VIII. SOME DESERT PLANTS IX. HOOKER'S HOT SPRINGS X. CANON ECHOES XI. THE METEORITE MOUNTAIN XII. THE CLIFF DWELLERS XIII. THE MOQUI INDIANS XIV. A FINE CLIMATE

CHAPTER I A ROMANTIC LAND

A stranger on first entering Arizona is impressed with the newness and wildness that surrounds him. Indeed, the change is so great that it seems like going to sleep and waking up in a new world. Everything that he sees is different from the familiar objects of his home, and he is filled with wonder and amazement at the many curious things that are brought to his notice. Judging the country by what is common back east, the average man is disappointed and prejudiced against what he sees; but, estimated on its merits, it is found to be a land of many attractions and great possibilities.

A hasty trip through the country by rail gives no adequate idea of its intrinsic value, as such a limited view only affords a superficial glimpse of what should be leisurely and carefully examined to be properly understood or appreciated. At the first glance it presents the appearance of a desert, but to one who is acquainted with its peculiarities it is by no means desolate. It furnishes a strong contrast to the rolling woodlands of the far east, and to the boundless prairies of the middle west; and, though it may never develop on the plan of the older states, like California, it has an individuality and charm of its own; and its endowment of natural wealth and beauty requires no borrowing from neighbors to give it character or success.

It has grand scenery, a salubrious climate, productive soil, rich mineral deposits and rare archaeological remains. It also has a diversified fauna and flora. The peccary, Gila monster, tarantula, centipede, scorpion and horned toad are specimens of its strange animal life; and, the numerous species of cacti, yucca, maguey, palo verde and mistletoe are samples of its curious vegetation. It is, indeed, the scientist's Paradise where much valuable material can be found to enrich almost every branch of natural science.

Hitherto its growth has been greatly retarded by its remote position in Uncle Sam's domain; but, with the comparatively recent advent of the railroad, the influx of capital and population, and the suppression of the once dreaded and troublesome Apache, a new life has been awakened that is destined to redeem the country from its ancient lethargy and make it a land of promise to many home seekers and settlers.

When the Spaniards under Coronado first entered the land more than three hundred and fifty years ago in search of the seven cities of Cibola, they found upon the desert sufficient evidence of an extinct race to prove that the land was once densely populated by an agricultural and prosperous people.

Enter page number   Next
Page 1 of 72
Words from 1 to 505 of 37033


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next

More links: First 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Last

Display Words Per Page: 250 500 1000

 
Africa (29)
Asia (27)
Europe (59)
North America (58)
Oceania (24)
South America (8)
 

List of Travel Books RSS Feeds

Africa Travel Books RSS Feed

Asia Travel Books RSS Feed

Europe Travel Books RSS Feed

North America Travel Books RSS Feed

Oceania Travel Books RSS Feed

South America Travel Books RSS Feed

Copyright © 2005 - 2012 Travel Guides