Vanished Arizona, Recollections Of The Army Life By A New England Woman By Martha Summerhayes




















































































































































 - Vanished Arizona, 
Recollections of the Army Life by a New England Woman


by Martha Summerhayes




TO MY SON HARRY SUMMERHAYES - Page 1
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Vanished Arizona, Recollections Of The Army Life By A New England Woman

By Martha Summerhayes

TO MY SON HARRY SUMMERHAYES WHO SHARED THE VICISSITUDES OF MY LIFE IN ARIZONA, THIS BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

Preface

I have written this story of my army life at the urgent and ceaseless request of my children.

For whenever I allude to those early days, and tell to them the tales they have so often heard, they always say: "Now, mother, will you write these stories for us? Please, mother, do; we must never forget them."

Then, after an interval, "Mother, have you written those stories of Arizona yet?" until finally, with the aid of some old letters written from those very places (the letters having been preserved, with other papers of mine, by an uncle in New England long since dead), I have been able to give a fairly connected story.

I have not attempted to commemorate my husband's brave career in the Civil War, as I was not married until some years after the close of that war, nor to describe the many Indian campaigns in which he took part, nor to write about the achievements of the old Eighth Infantry. I leave all that to the historian. I have given simply the impressions made upon the mind of a young New England woman who left her comfortable home in the early seventies, to follow a second lieutenant into the wildest encampments of the American army.

Hoping the story may possess some interest for the younger women of the army, and possibly for some of our old friends, both in the army and in civil life, I venture to send it forth.

POSTCRIPT (second edition).

The appendix to this, the second edition of my book, will tell something of the kind manner in which the first edition was received by my friends and the public at large.

But as several people had expressed a wish that I should tell more of my army experiences I have gone carefully over the entire book, adding some detail and a few incidents which had come to my mind later.

I have also been able, with some difficulty and much patient effort, to secure several photographs of exceptional interest, which have been added to the illustrations.

January, 1911.

CONTENTS

PREFACE

CHAPTER I. GERMANY AND THE ARMY II. I JOINED THE ARMY III. ARMY HOUSE-KEEPING IV. DOWN THE PACIFIC COAST V. THE SLUE VI. UP THE RIO COLORADO VII. THE MOJAVE DESERT VIII. LEARNING HOW TO SOLDIER IX. ACROSS THE MOGOLLONS X. A PERILOUS ADVENTURE XI. CAMP APACHE XII. LIFE AMONGST THE APACHES XIII. A NEW RECRUIT XIV. A MEMORABLE JOURNEY XV. FORDING THE LITTLE COLORADO XVI. STONEMAN'S LAKE XVII. THE COLORADO DESERT XVIII. EHRENBERG ON THE COLORADO XIX. SUMMER AT EHRENBERG XX. MY DELIVERER XXI. WINTER IN EHRENBERG XXII. RETURN TO THE STATES XXIII. BACK TO ARIZONA XXIV. UP THE VALLEY OF THE GILA XXV. OLD CAMP MACDOWELL XXVI. A SUDDEN ORDER XXVII. THE EIGHTH FOOT LEAVES ARIZONA XXVIII. CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA XXIX. CHANGING STATION XXX. FORT NIOBRARA XXXI. SANTA FE XXXII. TEXAS XXXIII. DAVID'S ISLAND

APPENDIX

Vanished Arizona

CHAPTER I

GERMANY AND THE ARMY

The stalwart men of the Prussian army, the Lancers, the Dragoons, the Hussars, the clank of their sabres on the pavements, their brilliant uniforms, all made an impression upon my romantic mind, and I listened eagerly, in the quiet evenings, to tales of Hanover under King George, to stories of battles lost, and the entry of the Prussians into the old Residenz-stadt; the flight of the King, and the sorrow and chagrin which prevailed.

For I was living in the family of General Weste, the former stadt-commandant of Hanover, who had served fifty years in the army and had accompanied King George on his exit from the city. He was a gallant veteran, with the rank of General-Lieutenant, ausser Dienst. A charming and dignified man, accepting philosophically the fact that Hanover had become Prussian, but loyal in his heart to his King and to old Hanover; pretending great wrath when, on the King's birthday, he found yellow and white sand strewn before his door, but unable to conceal the joyful gleam in his eye when he spoke of it.

The General's wife was the daughter of a burgomaster and had been brought up in a neighboring town. She was a dear, kind soul.

The house-keeping was simple, but stately and precise, as befitted the rank of this officer. The General was addressed by the servants as Excellenz and his wife as Frau Excellenz. A charming unmarried daughter lived at home, making, with myself, a family of four.

Life was spent quietly, and every evening, after our coffee (served in the living-room in winter, and in the garden in summer), Frau Generalin would amuse me with descriptions of life in her old home, and of how girls were brought up in her day; how industry was esteemed by her mother the greatest virtue, and idleness was punished as the most beguiling sin. She was never allowed, she said, to read, even on Sunday, without her knitting-work in her hands; and she would often sigh, and say to me, in German (for dear Frau Generalin spoke no other tongue), "Ach, Martha, you American girls are so differently brought up"; and I would say, "But, Frau Generalin, which way do you think is the better?" She would then look puzzled, shrug her shoulders, and often say, "Ach! times are different I suppose, but my ideas can never change."

Now the dear Frau Generalin did not speak a word of English, and as I had had only a few lessons in German before I left America, I had the utmost difficulty at first in comprehending what she said. She spoke rapidly and I would listen with the closest attention, only to give up in despair, and to say, "Gute Nacht," evening after evening, with my head buzzing and my mind a blank.

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