A Week On The Concord And Merrimack Rivers By Henry David Thoreau




















































































































































 - A WEEK ON THE CONCORD AND MERRIMACK RIVERS


By HENRY D. THOREAU, AUTHOR OF WALDEN, ETC.


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     Where'er thou sail'st who - Page 1
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A WEEK ON THE CONCORD AND MERRIMACK RIVERS

By HENRY D. THOREAU, AUTHOR OF "WALDEN," ETC.

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Where'er thou sail'st who sailed with me, Though now thou climbest loftier mounts, And fairer rivers dost ascend, Be thou my Muse, my Brother - .

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I am bound, I am bound, for a distant shore, By a lonely isle, by a far Azore, There it is, there it is, the treasure I seek, On the barren sands of a desolate creek.

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I sailed up a river with a pleasant wind, New lands, new people, and new thoughts to find; Many fair reaches and headlands appeared, And many dangers were there to be feared; But when I remember where I have been, And the fair landscapes that I have seen, ^Thou^ seemest the only permanent shore, The cape never rounded, nor wandered o'er.

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Fluminaque obliquis cinxit declivia ripis; Quae, diversa locis, partim sorbentur ab ipsa; In mare perveniunt partim, campoque recepta Liberioris aquae, pro ripis litora pulsant. ^Ovid^, Met. I. 39

He confined the rivers within their sloping banks, Which in different places are part absorbed by the earth, Part reach the sea, and being received within the plain Of its freer waters, beat the shore for banks.

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CONCORD RIVER.

"Beneath low hills, in the broad interval Through which at will our Indian rivulet Winds mindful still of sannup and of squaw, Whose pipe and arrow oft the plough unburies, Here, in pine houses, built of new-fallen trees, Supplanters of the tribe, the farmers dwell."

^Emerson^.

The Musketaquid, or Grass-ground River, though probably as old as the Nile or Euphrates, did not begin to have a place in civilized history, until the fame of its grassy meadows and its fish attracted settlers out of England in 1635, when it received the other but kindred name of ^Concord^ from the first plantation on its banks, which appears to have been commenced in a spirit of peace and harmony.

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